Trigeminal Neuralgia – Officially an Underlying Diagnosis for MBHM

It has taken me a while to gather my thoughts enough to sit down and write this. I feel I should dive in and just say it, and then ramble about after. I also feel that just saying it here makes it final and real, and perhaps that is why I have been putting it off.

On November 3rd, my neurologist declared that given my pain history and my response to Oxcarbazepine, that Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN2) is an underlying cause for my Monster Migraine. The TN2 continually triggers migraine symptoms, and everything keeps cycling, and this is why nothing has been successful.

This diagnosis means a few things. First, it means that I have a reason for my pain. Second, it means that I have a community of sufferers to join and learn from. Third, it means that I have a disease that currently has no cure. Fourth, it means that there are new treatment options open to me that, if successful, may lead to a better quality of life than I am currently living.

And, lastly, it means that I have gone from hoping that my pain will one day end to realizing that my pain is something I will have to manage for the rest of my life.

That last thing has been difficult to process. I have cried. I have been angry. I have acted rashly, or hyper-rationally… or something. I have turned to treatment options I have previously refused because I saw them as too painful or too pointless. I began acupuncture this past Friday and am going to see my acupuncturist twice a week until I see some results. I am going to turn to outside-the-box pain medications.

I have launched my own, personal war on Trigeminal Neuralgia.

I have curled into a ball and hidden under blankets.

I have talked to friends.

I have avoided friends.

I have felt relief.

I started a secret self care group on Facebook for when I have feelings and I need some kind of support. I started writing in a journal. I started falling apart. I started getting my shit together.

I definitely started forgiving myself for some things.

I have a disease, and that makes my head hurt all of the time and fires up ye aulde migraine making machine constantly. Fuels it. Makes it glow red hot.

Cool. So there is that.

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The Handbook for People with Pain + MBHM SURPRISE!

We interrupt this brief My Brain Hates Me hiatus to bring you the following announcement! As a delegate for the Power of Pain Foundation, I’ve received 25 copies of The Handbook for People with Pain,  which is a great (and short) resource guide for anyone living with pain. I’ll be mailing copies to some of my Facebook followers along with a special surprise in the month of November! If you’re living with a painful condition, or know someone who is, please click here to like MBHM on Facebook to learn how you could get a MBHM surprise along with the book! The book is available to download at www.InTheFaceofPain.com!

Get a free copy at http://www.InTheFaceOfPain.com or get 1 of 25 copies personally mailed to you along with a personalized surprise from My Brain Hates Me by checking MBHM out on Facebook!

My Perfectly Okay Codependent Relationship… with My Dog

Meet Oliver:

Terrible doggie

Oliver Wilkes Dogg (Puggle extraordinaire) is my non-human life partner and we have a codependent relationship. We are not ashamed. Oliver is the literal reason that I get out of bed in the morning (around 9 when he wants to go out after his post-breakfast nap.) Oliver is the reason I get exercise (because I have to race through the house telling him not to pee on something before I can get him outside.) Oliver is my napping buddy. Oliver is a source of joy and laughter and unconditional affection. Oliver is terrible in the best way.

Oliver eats our underwear. Oliver unabashedly goes to the bathroom as a means of punishing us for wrongs we don’t know we’ve committed. Oliver carries the skins of his stuffed animal victims around with him. Except Burnie, Oliver loves his dragon, Burnie, and has left him mainly intact.

Oliver eats like a goat… paper towels, tissues, any kind of food, plastic, money hair accessories, or bath accessories. You name it, Oliver has swallowed it whole and lived to tell the tale in the voice that we use to talk for him.

Oliver sleeps like this:

Sleeping terrible doggie

… especially when we’re upset with him.

Or like this:

Doggie tongue

… because he is a master manipulator and uses his powers of puppy-face against us so we don’t kill him.

Oliver is my best friend. When my head hurts, Oliver says, “Mama and I have a migraine,” and he curls up under the covers and naps all day with no complaints. When I’m upset, or having a really bad pain day, he puts himself across my body like a seat belt and keeps me warm and secure. He isn’t afraid of my meltdowns. He doesn’t mind that sometimes I’m not in the mood for his whimsy. He just carries on being whimsical at me until I am in the mood. He licks my feet when they are freezing. He gets his one kiss a day. Petting him makes me feel nice. I have trouble sleeping when he is elsewhere.

I have a codependent relationship with my dog, and that’s okay.

Trigeminal Neuralgia & a Better Day

I woke at 5:30 this morning. As always, I stayed very still as consciousness slipped into my body. As always, I waited for the pain to wake up and spread through my head like a hot poker. The pain wakes up 1-2 minutes after I do. Some miracle of body chemistry keeps me from feeling anything for a moment or so. This moment is both my favourite and most hated time of day. For a moment I am pain free. For a moment I am terrified that the pain will start and be worse than it has been before. For a moment… I am frozen.

This morning, as I waited for the pain to burn through me, I thought about how my pain has aged me. I thought about the bags under my eyes. I thought about my skin and my hair that falls out in clumps. I thought about the weight all of the stress and medication have caused me to gain. Then the pain hit, starting from my left eye and radiating outward, across my forehead and scalp, down my neck, into my shoulders. It’s an evil feeling. It’s like being afraid of the bogeyman, arm hairs on end, knowing he’s real but also knowing no one can see him.

But this morning my bogeyman was less frightening.

It has been approximately 10 months since I experienced anything close to a decent pain-level day. It has been exactly one month since I began taking medication intended to rule out Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN). Today, my pain level is a 6. This past Thursday, I experienced a level 5 pain day.

I can’t express how amazing this is.

My neurologist was not able to rule out type 2 TN at our consultation last month. Her only solution was to put me on the medication most commonly used to treat TN, Oxcarbazepine (OXC) and  wait for improvement. OXC, also known as Trileptal, is an anti-seizure medication. My dosage started at 300 mg per day and was then increased to 600 mg per day two weeks later.

Granted, I received a Botox treatment the same day I began taking the medication. It is highly possible that the Botox is the reason for my random better pain level days. Two good days out of an 8-10 month period is not a trend. It is an anomaly.

A very welcome anomaly.

Having a better day, not a good day, but a better day makes me want to accomplish things. Unfortunately, the best way for me to keep my Monster Migraine tamed is to rest and avoid over-exerting myself. A better day merely means a more restful day.

A very welcome anomaly.

5 Quick Self Care Tips

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Bad day? Here are 5 things you can do RIGHT NOW to feel better:
  1. EAT, SLEEP, HYDRATE! Okay, that’s three things. I cheated. But, trust me, if you’re hungry, tired, or dehydrated- you can feel better instantly by taking care of it NOW!
  2. MUSIC! Listen to something that soothes you. It could be Enya or your fave death metal. It doesn’t matter what you choose, so long as it speaks to your inner calm.
  3. BREATH! Try the 4-7-8 breathing exercise, or any deep breathing strategy to relax your body and engage  the parasympathetic nervous system. It slows the heart rate and calms the body.
  4. CREATE! Art can take our brains to another place. It can help us focus when we listen, and help us express feelings in a safe way. It can also help us relax. Try painting, colouring, or using whatever you have on hand to get creative. anything crafty will do. Sew, knit, sculpt, glue something! It doesn’t have to be pretty to make you feel better.
  5. CHANGE YOUR ENVIRONMENT! If you’re at work, try taking a quick break. If you’re at home, change rooms. Wherever you are, if you are upset, in pain, or anxious… it can help your mind and body switch gears if you change locations. Work within your limits. If a walk is too challenging, sit on the porch. If you can’t take a break at work, try a quick stretch. Adjust the temperature, change the channel, cuddle something soft. Think of the following words when you’re making a change: stimulate, distract, control.

#MyPainFace & #MyInvisiblePain : Two Fun, Easy Ways to Spread Awareness

I’m not having a good week, so I haven’t worn my human mask much. But I did recently share THIS POST about Making Invisible Illness Visible. LonBonLonLon on Tumblr is trying to get the hashtag #MyInvisiblePain to trend, and I’m trying to get #MyPainFace to trend. So I thought I’d do a little of both this morning…

Here is #MyPainFace from this past February, playing in the snow until the brightness got to me.

SnowsmileFeb2015

And here is #MyInvisiblePain … the things you can’t see going on with me, but I assure you were happening in this picture. I’m not squinting to be cute.

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That’s just from the neck up, really. I left off things like nausea and dizziness because I couldn’t figure out how to illustrate them.

Share your lovely face with the world. Show everyone that people who are suffering can look like everyone else! Tag your photo #MyPainFace on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr or Instagram!

Or get to doodling, and share your symptoms to help spread awareness of invisible illnesses! Use #MyInvisiblePain on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, or Instagram!

And if you’d like to share it with My Brain Hates Me, tag me too! @MyBrainHatesMe on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and @niansahc on Instagram!

Suicide, Depression, T-Shirts, & Deadly Rashes with My Brain Hates Me

Power of Pain Foundation

Donate to http://powerofpain.org/ or become a delegate yourself by clicking here: http://powerofpain.org/delegates-of-popf/

Suicide & Depression Hotlines

United States Hotlines

Depression Hotline: 1-630-482-9696

Suicide Hotline: 1-800-784-8433 FREE

LifeLine: 1-800-273-8255 FREE

Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386 FREE

Sexuality Support: 1-800-246-7743 FREE

Eating Disorders Hotline: 1-847-831-3438

Rape and Sexual Assault: 1-800-656-4673 FREE

Grief Support: 1-650-321-5272

Runaway: 1-800-843-5200 FREE, 1-800-843-5678 FREE, 1-800-621-4000 FREE

Exhale: After Abortion Hotline/Pro-Voice: 1-866-439-4253 FREE

National Alliance on Mental Illness www.nami.org

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention www.afsp.org

SAVE www.save.org

International Bipolar Foundation www.ibpf.org

No Stigmas www.nostigmas.org

Active Minds www.activeminds.org

My Brain Hates Me Stuff!

https://www.facebook.com/MyBrainHatesMe – Like me on FACEBOOK
https://twitter.com/MyBrainHatesMe – Follow me on TWITTER

Get an original MONSTER BRAIN shirt https://represent.com/mybrain-hates-me

or Lights Out, MONSTER BRAIN shirt https://represent.com/monsterbrainlightsout

8 Ways to Distract Yourself from Your Chronic Condition

No matter what you’re going through, be it depression, a chronic condition, or just a rough patch in your life, it’s important to give your mind and body a break now and then. A friend of mine, who is a Reiki practitioner, was over to do a session with me this past week. She told me that I needed to laugh more. I think this is true for all of us. As she said, as so many have said, “laughter is the best medicine.”

I think that laughter is a powerful form of distraction, the most powerful in fact. There are other ways to take a brief vacation from mental and biological negativity, however. Here’s are some things to try:

  1. Laugh. It’s not always as simple as just laughing. I get that. But what are some things that make you laugh? Silly movies? Ridiculous cat pictures? Baby animals? People falling down? Do you have a friend who always makes you smile? You used to laugh, and you need to do it more. Laughing hurts less than crying.
  2. Get creative. I learned to play the ukulele after I became disabled. It’s something I can do with my hands that doesn’t require thinking. I can play happy things or sad things. The point is that, while I’m playing, I’m not thinking about how much I hurt. I also draw and embroider. If you have a condition that limits your fine motor skills, there is always finger painting. I’m serious. Get messy! Make something! I shared the story of a woman I met at the Jefferson Headache Center who makes rubber band bracelets on a loom. She can only manage the energy to work on one for 15 minutes, but that’s enough time to finish. At the end, she’s happy to have a new bracelet. I have friends who are talented crafters, photographers, performers, and musicians… and all of them struggle with something.
  3. Learn something. Sometimes it’s hard to feel passionate about anything at all when you lack hope about the future. However, I bet there’s something you’ve always been curious about. Depening upon the severity of your condition and the level of your daily function, your ability to spend time with friends or dedicate a lot of energy to projects may be limited. But your mind still works, and it’s aching to be used and kept spry. From puzzles to out an out research on a topic to free online courses to actually enrolling in an online university… there are many ways to pursue knowledge and keep your brain in shape. Do you love science? History? Philosophy? Embrace your hunger for knowledge and force the spark for learning. The more you look into a topic, the more you might find you want to know. Not only will this give you something to talk about other than your condition (which is just a fact of life when you have anything with the word “chronic” in front of it), it will make you feel good about yourself.
  4. Netflix/Podcast binge. Yes, I said it.Binge. I know that studies have shown that a binge on shows can lead to negative emotional whatever. Fine. But you know what a binge does for me? It passes the hours upon hours that I spend in bed where I am absolutely unable to do anything other than just be in bed in pain. I can’t even look at the television, but I can listen to it. And if the light bothers me too much, podcasts are a beautiful thing. I spend hours alone while my family is at work and school. Having human voices around is nice. I can’t be productive, but I can listen to/watch things that interest me or comfort me. I can learn, I can laugh, I can feel uplifted… all from the comfort of my fetal position.
  5. Listen to music. Bob Marley said, “One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain.” I choose to take that in a lot of ways. Music is soothing, there’s no doubt about it. Your favourite tunes can elicit all kinds of memories. Actively creating music by playing an instrument or singing, and listening to music are both equally as restorative. You don’t have to listen to light, fluffy music. If you’re angry about what you’re going through, you might feel better if you listen to some angry music. Get it out. It’s okay to feel what you feel. You have every right to be upset about what’s happening to your mind and body. This list isn’t about sugar-coating your condition. It’s about distracting you.
  6. Do stuff with friends. This is a tricky one. Friends can be a double-edged sword. Your good friends who understand what you’re going through will treat you like a human being and not like a fragile doll. Everyone else might be weird around you and that might be unpleasant. Chronic conditions really show you who will stick by you, and you’ve lost people and made new friends a long the way. My husband and I have worked hard to construct a social life that brings the party to us yet allows me to rest and slip away if I need to. We have people over to our house, we ask friends to help with the set-up and clean-up. We make them potluck events so we aren’t doing a lot of the work. I have friends over for show marathons and silly sleep overs. I wear my pajamas because it’s my damned house. My friends are cool with this. They get it. My friends understand that I can’t always drive. We do ridiculous, silly things. It’s all about finding the right people to spend time with.
  7. Get physical. I don’t mean exercise. You should do that too. I mean touch someone, or have them touch you. Massage, caresses, tickling, even intimate touch can be a great distraction. It doesn’t have to be sexual. As much as I hate to admit it, when I’m having a horrible pain day, it’s pretty awesome when my dog licks my feet. I frequently ask my husband to touch my back lightly. Simply being touched on a part of my body that doesn’t hurt is a great distraction. When I’m home alone, I use a soft ball to apply pressure to sore points on my back. Tennis balls work too. Heating pads and ice packs help draw my attention away from my pain. It’s all about pulling my attention elsewhere.
  8. Meditation and breathing exercises. If you live with chronic pain or depression and you aren’t already meditating or practicing controlled breathing on a regular basis, now is the time to start! Introducing calmness into your world is important for your mental and physical health. I’m not going to try to pitch it to you. I’m just going to tell you that I meditate and I use breathing exercises and they help me immensely. I think they could be good for you and you should give them a shot. That’s just my opinion. Here are some great resources to try if you need some help:

My Brain Hates Me Becomes Delegate for the Power of Pain National Pain Foundation

I’m pleased to announce that I’ll be acting as a delegate for the Power of Pain Foundation to help spread education and awareness about chronic pain. Check out http://powerofpain.org/ for information about events in your area, or how you too can spread awareness!

Sharing my experience, breaking stigmas, and educating others about my condition has become a part of my daily life as a chronic pain sufferer. I’m very excited to join others in the mission to make the world a friendlier place for those of us living with pain.
Power of Pain Delegate Wings

This isn’t some special honour reserved for crotchety bloggers like me. Anyone who wants to help can become a delegate. All you have to do is apply. Click here to learn more.

Happy Painiversary, My Brain Hates Me!

MBHMlogo

Happy 3rd Painiversary, My Brain Hates Me!

In 2012, something started going wrong with my head. On August 7th, 2012, after my first productive and full day of work in a long while, I went home, sat down in my kitchen, and my head started hurting again. It never stopped. That day was both the last day I remember feeling good, and the beginning of my Monster Migraine.

It’s been a long, depressing, painful, maddening three years. There’s nothing happy about living with chronic pain. There’s nothing fun about being buried under tons of medical debt. There is no reason to celebrate today.

However, I’m alive. I’m alive and you’re reading this. Maybe your body has betrayed you in some way. Maybe someone you know lives with pain. Maybe someone you know thinks a little differently. Maybe you think a little differently. You’re alive too. We’re getting through the day.

This isn’t a joyous day for me, but it’s also not the end of the world. I live in the 8-10 pain range. all of the damned time. Yesterday, I had Botox treatment and a lot of new things were discussed at my appointment. I sleep sporadically. I’m grumpy frequently. I’m pretty darn depressed. I do have a family that loves me, though, and a ridiculous dog, and a roof over my head. Things could always be worse.

Therefore, on this day of sarcastic remembrance, I shall embrace the fact that I have grown as a person because of my pain and that I have accomplished some good things because of my pain, and that not everything is horrible.

Thank you for reading over the past few years, and for continuing to read in the years to come. You’re rad, and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Love Your Friendly Neighborhood Pain Grump,

My Brain Hates Me

Chronic Illness Cat On Pain Scales

chronic-illness-cat:

from the amazing Nikki Ourand Lambert

[picture of a Siamese cat’s head against a triangle-sectioned background with many shades of blue. Top line of text reads: I’ve lived with chronic, severe pain for so long now || Bottom line of text reads: that I no longer have a frame of reference for the pain scale.]

Chronic Illness Illustrated

rookiemag:

Chronic Illness, Explained

Some ways I’ve learned to manage my longstanding health conditions. By Jamia. Illustration by Leanna.

Sex and Chronic Pain

I’m an adult female in my thirties and I like sex. There, I said it. I’m a woman who likes sex. But there’s a problem with my sex life… and it’s a whopper. I have a chronic and painful neurological condition.

When I crawl into bed with my partner, I bring my pain with me. And it’s not the fun, kinky sort of pain. It’s the nauseating, ice-pack-clinging, opioid-needing kind of pain that takes over my entire body and makes everything from bathing to driving difficult. So you can imagine how trying to relax and enjoy myself physically might be an issue.

“Chronic pain is evil incarnate and doesn’t want anyone it affects to get laid.”

Though it isn’t just the pain that causes trouble, the medications can muck things up as well. Most of my medications affect sexual desire and function to some extent. Sometimes my flesh is willing but my mind just won’t get there. Other times my mind is aching for action, but my body won’t cooperate.

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Between knowing that I’m in physical agony most of the time, feeling my frustration with my own sexual dysfunction, and experiencing many of the unpleasant and disgusting side effects of my condition and medications up close- my partner has it tough as well. Recently, he admitted that hearing me vomit so frequently really affected the mood. While not my fault, and not something that affects his ability to see me as a sexual or desirous creature, it’s still not sexy to hear someone puke all of the time.

Chronic pain negatively affects physical affection in my relationship. That wouldn’t be so terrible if chronic pain didn’t also cause things like depression and anxiety and loneliness. As someone who lives with chronic pain, depressive thoughts are often overwhelming, and sometimes the simplest act of affection can calm me. Yet the one thing that I need, human contact, is the one thing that my chronic pain has pushed away.

Most of the day I am in the fetal position, listening to something, doing the small things I can accomplish here and there. Things like date nights are often tense, rescheduled, or we just give up and stay home. A lack of sexual or affectionate contact in a relationship can lead to an expectation of sexual or affectionate contact in a relationship. Those expectations cause pressures on all partners, which lead to stress, which lead to further issues in the bedroom.

Chronic pain is evil incarnate and doesn’t want anyone it affects to get laid.

Dating with chronic pain can be difficult as well. Imagine having to disclose personal health information to someone you hardly know simply because you might have to reschedule or cancel. Sure, you could not tell them. But then you seem like a flakey jerk who is wasting their dating time. The right thing to do is to be up front with people about your capabilities and your schedule. But what if it’s a first date? How do you ever get to the second date?

Marriages end because of chronic illnesses. With that kind of weight bearing down on me all of the time it’s impossible to feel sexy or impulsive. There is no levity in my relationship. My pain is my ball and chain, not my partner.

How do we get that spark back when I put more value on wearing makeup and taking pain medication to look human for social events than I do on doing the same for my partner. How do I feel sexy when I’ve resigned myself to never having sex again because it hurts less emotionally than hoping that sex will happen? How is someone supposed to want me when I’m curled up with an ice pack and a heating pad and I haven’t canged my pajamas in two days?

For better or for worse, in sickness and in health is kind of bullshit. Yes, we stick around, but it doesn’t mean we’re still attracted to the people who are wasting away physically or emotionally in front of our eyes. It doesn’t mean that we can think of them as anything other than fragile and broken. It doesn’t mean we aren’t just too damned sad to even think about sex.

I honestly did set out to write a helpful blog filled with relationship tips for maintaining your sex life while living with chronic pain, but it wouldn’t be honest. I’m not maintaining a sex life while living with chronic pain. I’m mourning a sex life while living with chronic pain. I’ve done the research and a lot of it is standard advice about communication and date nights and making time for your partners. It’s all about keeping things special between you. I can’t tell you how to do that because I don’t know how to do that. I don’t know what any of that is like.

It is important to try to maintain as much of your self as you can when you live with a chronic illness, and it is also important to know when to let some things go. Perhaps this is simply something I need to let go.

Image courtesy of marin at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Lost All Hope: Information on suicide methods, statistics and help

Lost All Hope is absolutely the best website about suicide I have come across. It’s factual. I like facts. Facts are comforting. Numbers are real. I don’t like being pandered to or actively listened to. I want someone to give me concrete information.

From the carefully ordered menu that guides you through help and mindfulness, to the cited references that offer further interesting resources… this site is lovingly crafted. A must read for those of us struggling with a lack of desire to wake up in the morning.

 

“Lost All Hope has no angle. The site is non-profit. It has no religious affiliation. It has no political stand point on the whys and wherefores, pros and cons, of suicide or euthanasia. It offers no advice, and has no bulletin boards, chat or forums (although does link to some). It is here as an impartial resource, to help inform you, and make whatever choice is right for you. I hope you find it of use.”

via Lost All Hope: Information on suicide methods, statistics and help.

Why I Talk About Pain & Depression & You Should Too

Depressed vs. Depressing

Many people in my life know me as a cheerful, friendly person. I’ve been called caring and giving. Someone once even went so far as to call me “sunny.”  Those aren’t ways in which you’d expect to hear a person living with extreme chronic pain and depression to be described. When people hear “chronic pain and ” they often think “miserable, awful, unbearable”… “sunny”  is the last word they’d use.

And that’s why I talk about what is happening to my body and my mind. That’s why I share the darkest thoughts that I have, and my bad days, and my painful hours through this blog. I feel that it is important for people to understand that a human being is not the sum of their diagnosis. I am not my pain. I can be miserable and I can enjoy life.

I have moments when I don’t want to live. The remainder of the time I’m thinking about how thankful I am for the time I have with my family. I have moments when my pain is so tremendous that everything else in the world stops and I am alone in a dark room, enshrouded by despair. I also have functional hours where I suffer through putting on makeup and socialize, smiling and laughing with my friends… pretending that the pain doesn’t exist.

Accepting Myself

My pain and depression and anxiety and my ASD don’t ever go away. These are things that are part of me. I used to be ashamed of them. I let people make me feel ashamed of them. I allowed doctors and friends and family to tell me that these were things to get over… from which I had to recover. I allowed other people’s discomfort with my health and mental state dictate how I interacted with the world. Mind you, I’m not saying that I’m not trying to find a cure for my chronic pain or proper treatment options to manage my depression or anxiety. I very much want to stop the pain I live with daily and I would love to live without negative thoughts. However, these things are part of my current existence and I shouldn’t have to hide them. I most certainly shouldn’t have to be ashamed of them.

ASD is not a thing to be cured. My Monster Migraine is not my fault. Depression and anxiety are also not my fault. These are not things I am doing wrong in my life. ASD is how my brain processes information. The rest is unfortunate, but part of who I am now.

But guess what? I’m also a positive, sunny, caring, helpful person who smiles and laughs. I’m silly.

Why I Won’t Shut Up

I talk about pain and depression because they are things that happen to me. I want the people I know to understand what I’m going through. I want people who might be going through similar issues to feel like they aren’t alone. I want the medical community to understand that patients are human beings who share their experiences, deserve the best possible care. Frankly, I also find it therapeutic to talk about my issues freely and be part of a community of people I consider to be survivors of themselves.

I’m not talking about the latest breakthroughs in anti-depressants during entire social engagements. I’m not waxing philosophical about suicide prevention around the dinner table. I am being honest with people when they ask how I am, and correcting misinformation in conversations when I hear it, and updating people if they show curiosity about my condition. Therefore, talking about pain and depression doesn’t have to be a constant endeavor, it just has to be something that I’m open to when the opportunity arises.

Why You Should Talk About Your Pain & Depression

Aside from the obvious therapeutic benefits that being heard and understood can provide, you would be amazed how may people don’t know about your condition. You’d also be surprised how many people know a little bit about your condition, but what they do know is horribly incorrect. You’d also be surprised that for every few people you talk to openly about your pain and depression, you may be giving someone the strength to speak out about their own suffering.

I would not have started this blog had it not been for other people who had the courage to talk about this weird thing going on with their brains. I would not have become an advocate for mental health awareness. I wouldn’t have learned as much as I have about.

You should not be ashamed to talk about suicidal thoughts, depression, anxiety, or chronic conditions because they aren’t your fault and because there are people who will support you. You may not know those people yet, or you might be surrounded by those people right now and they just don’t know how to help you and support you because they don’t understand what you’re going through.

Talk about it. I do. It helps.

Where and How to Talk About It

Here is a My Brain Hates Me (very much not a medical or psychological professional) Guide to ways to talk about what’s going on with your body and your mind: